Half Indian Doors and Memories in Little Red Note Books.

Yesterday I found myself caught by a reader and feel I got to set something straight:

We left the Indian version of spring behind about one week ago, recover now in a tiny medieval town in Southern-Germany and I am writing you from my office table at the window of a small rooftop writing chamber. Overlooking the flower dotted garden and listening to bird&bee&frog&sun sounds flooding up from the world out there through my window right in to my ear.

I am writing from memory, typing things out of my mind (or in to my mind?) as I go, going through my little red note book I usually carry and scraping thick layers of images of my hard disc.

India had proven to have quite limited Internet possibilities for the non iphoned backpacker. Whilst millions of people in India run around equipped with Blackberries, the vast majority of the 1,25 billion has to go for a quest to find Internet Cafés in back-yards, 3sqm/8 PCs side-chambers of pharmacies or in staircase corners. Besides that, one hour of Internet is not expensive for me, the western visitor, but is at the price of a simple meal in a village tea stall – which made me feel just not so great and I decided to spend my time and money on food, transport and accommodation instead.

Accommodation. 1st timers in India-Travels, we took a tent. Stupidly we did not think about that there are already people in this country where ever you set you foot. So we discovered all levels of accommodation from Indian dormitory to tourist-resort, but left the tent unpacked. We had the pleasure to find out about home-stay in villages in Nagaland at the Chinese border and we dove deeply in to the couchsurfing cosmos. But that later. Let’s stick with the straight memory lane and leg number three:

Rishikesh is an Eldorado for people who wanna learn and experience. Having arrived only two days back in India, we stayed at a distance, still besotted from colours and options and kept at taking pictures. Something we know we can do for sure successfully and quite easily.

I love the how they turn their backs. Oh, and I got their phone number in case you wanna book! It’s cheap and very flexible cut to your needs and it smelled fabulous!

I also loved the Indian solution to breaking down half a house and having to cut a lovely arch in to two by doing so. The (Spanish?) window I saw here reminded me this door and made me post it.

Short after arriving in India, just after you worked down your initial cultural shock, you will be so in love with all the colors and painted houses and billboard coated walls, you almost certainly will find yourself thinking about how you can paint at home what in which way…and come back with a suitcase full of refurbishing ideas. You even will wanna paint your neighbours houses!

I took home this fantastic corner-paint-underwear-billboard to show it to my kids.

In the evenings, even the nature starts to be colored, shine and glow. Well, it might do that at home as well. But in India, it feels much more Indian.

Oh, here you can find in loose order images from my other travels, my home in Munich etc. The view from the window, I am sitting at now, I photographed last time in winter. You can see it here.

Our last stop, Haridwar, you’ll find here. Meantime we arrived home. You can read about it here.

Other posts from our India Travel Diary are:
I use Trains when travelling in India
Happy Holi – Spring in India
Running from Holi we took Rescue in Haridwar
Half Indian Doors and Memories in little red Note Books
Guwahati, Assam, North-East India.
Assamese Cuisine, German Spätzle And What’s Slime Got To Do With It
Tea Gardens And Kaziranga
Lovely People and Empty Ministries: Kohima
Twice a Day a Bus at the End of the Known World: Khonoma
Last Stop Paradise: Meghalaya, India
Another Travel Diary of mine takes you to Israel and Palestine in 2012. You can start reading it here

Thanks for coming with me on this journey.

 

14 thoughts on “Half Indian Doors and Memories in Little Red Note Books.

    • All images above have been taken in Rishikesh. The half door and the dry river bed in “Lower Rishikesh” close to Nirmal Ashram Hospital. The cooking class and billboard close to Laxman Jhula in the mountains where the more touristic Rishikesh can be found.

      • the picture of the half door there is amazing.

        btw, there is a Sivananda Yoga ashram near Rishikesh. Great refuge away from the noisy (and grossly mismanaged) holy sites in India – even if you are not into yoga. That reminds me, i have to stop postponing that trip to Ashram and visit sometime soon.

        gr8 shots.
        cheers,
        Samyak
        ThoughtTavern

  1. Pingback: Running from Holi we Took Rescue in Haridwar. « ⠁⠁⠁ I love light. I love air.

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